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Ring of the Month: AGL Certified 4.30 Carat Burma Ruby and Mine Cut Diamond Ring

Oct 23, 2020

By virtue of being both a buyer and seller of estate jewelry, we often have the privilege of coming across truly rare gemological pieces. Over the summer, we acquired a stunning ruby and diamond ring which has proven to be among the rarest of gems: a Burmese ruby. There are few rubies left in Burma, now known as Myanmar, as 500 years of mining has thoroughly depleted their natural resources. Consequently, Burmese rubies are hard to come by, keeping prices and demand high.

But what makes a Burmese ruby so special?

Burmese rubies are considered the best rubies in the world, primarily because of its color. They range from a pinkish red color to a vivid pigeon blood color, which is analogous to the iconic red of a ruby. The bluish-red body color, combined with natural red fluorescence, helps give the stones a saturated, vivid appearance. It is also common among Burmese rubies for there to be miniscule inclusions which help increase the light performance. What that essentially means is that it creates a silky, soft depth to the color, making it even more beautiful.

One of the world’s largest, finest, and yes, most famous Burmese rubies is housed in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. Weighing in at an incredible 23.1-carats, the ruby displays the characteristic saturated, deep red color with incredible transparency. The ruby is set in a platinum ring with diamonds and dates back to the 1930s when it was originally mined.

Incidentally, the Burmese ruby we acquired has strikingly similar characteristics to the one in the Smithsonian. Weighing in at 4.30-carats, our cushion-cut ruby is surrounded by 12 mine-cut diamonds that add approximately another 2.40-carats. Altogether, the ring weighs 6.8 grams. Like its companion in the Smithsonian, our ring also dates back to the 1930s and is set in a platinum ring with a stunning art deco style.

A common practice with ruby mining is to use heat to enhance color and clarity. To find a Burmese ruby that hasn’t been heat treated is considered rare. That’s why we were so delighted when we came across this beautiful piece, because there is no evidence of it having been heat treated. To confirm our suspicions, we had the gem verified by the experts at American Gemological Laboratories – an industry leader in gem identification, treatment, and provenance determinations. This allows us to know for certain that what we have is exceptional and a beautiful piece for the right buyer.

Finding a new home for beautiful estate pieces is a specialty of Samuelson’s – and it is no different for our AGL Certified 4.30 Carat Burma Ruby and Mine Cut Diamond Ring. If you’re interested in purchasing the stunning cocktail ring or learning more, visit our page here.

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